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gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
to a deal in washington today. you can tell from the sell-off, investors do not like it. >> no, posting their largest decline since november 14th, in case you were wondering. although we are off the lows of the session right now. the dow was down 189 two hours into the trading session. we've come off those lows. but at this point, the dow is down 1% for the week and we are down 1% today at 13,173. nasdaq lower, as well. let's see how many percentage points we're down right now. down 1.25%. the technology sector is taking a bigger hit today. down to 3,012 on the nasdaq and the s&p 500 index is down 1% at 1428. . >> house speaker john boehner says he's still open to a offer from the democrats. >> it was a dramatic evening last night. john harwood was there. he has the latest on the on talks. are there any talks, john? >> i think so. but they're pretty muted. this bill was not win of those weeks that makes washington look good. come to think of it, there aren't many weeks that make washington look good. but this was especially especially difficult because you had negotiations getting close
if taxes go up in 2013. host: flags all around washington, d.c. are at half staff this morning like the one you are feeling on the capital. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." for the first hour we will be talking about the aftermath of the shooting of in newtown, conn that happened yesterday. we will talk about the actions of the teachers. we will get into discussion about gun-control. that always seems to come up after situations like this. we would like for you to get involved in the conversation. the numbers are on the screen. we want to hear from teachers and people who work in the classrooms, principals and vice principals, people connected with education to find your thoughts on what happened yesterday. the actions of the teachers. how safe are in america's schools and america's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing
in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the n.r.a. (202)585-3883 this is for n.r.a. members. you can also reach out to us at twitter.com/cspanwj and f.s.a. -- and facebook at and the headline face of the n.r.a. mountains a forceful defense advocate of armed school guards excels at lighting fires under supporters and critics alike. guest: we'll get back to more of the newspaper articles this morning regarding the n.r.a.'s response to the newtown shoot
leaders in washington. good morning. not an easy night for speaker john boehner. >> yes, he is coming off as having a very difficult day. he was hoping that his fellow republicans would rally around his across-the-board tax hikes that come with a fiscal cliff great he was asking fiscal conservatives to swallow some tax hikes. only on those that make more than a million dollars per year for some, that was a bridge too far. >> he is my speaker and i support him strongly. he is in a very difficult position. but i just happen to disagree with this in the correct message. raising taxes on any american, to me is not the right message at all. it is cutting spending. >> the speaker points out that the house has passed a measure that will stop all the tax hikes next year. as he said, it is all in the hands of the senate. bill: will we hear from the president? swivels democratic governments do in response? >> and i think the short answer is probably not much. at least not in the immediate offering here. the senate is in session today, but there's nothing more until later next week. as for the presi
in washington. at this hour, congressional leaders are working to find common ground desperate for some sort of compromise, my sources tell me this morning the odds of a deal are still no better than 50/50. the senate will convene today at 1:00 p.m., the house back in at 2:00 p.m. stock measures around the world are on edge. the dow down five days in a row falling nearly 160 points friday and early indications are those losses could be much worse if there is no deal. consumers are jittery too. their confidence in the economy plunging for the second straight month falling to its lowest level since august. that's where we begin. let's get the latest from two top senate leaders joining us now senator chuck schumer of new york, senator jon kyl of arizona. so, gentlemen, do we have a deal? >> well, there are certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid, but there's a real possibility of a deal. i've been a legislator for 37 years and i've watched how these things work on these big, big agreements they almost always happen at the last minute. neither side likes to give
boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. disagreements among republicans and democrats here on capitol hill is nothing new, but tuesday a republican aide told us the two sides aren't even talking. not surprisingly the white house disagrees. >> i can guarantee you conversations continue at different levels. and among different groups. >> reporter: both parties are ready to play the blame game in case negotiations fail. >> there's only one person out of 370 million americans who can sign something into law and that's the president. >> 60% of americans are asking the wealthy to pay more. >> reporter: a "the washington post" poll say 53% of americans will blame republicans and 29% would hold the president responsible if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. the two sides appear close to an agreement on little things. it could lead to higher airline ticket prices and no more mail delivery on saturday. >> oh, boy. susan mcginnis in washington this morning. susan, thank you so much. one of the tax breaks due to expire n
. i think the best way to break this political gridlock in washington is to go directly to the american people because it's we the people that can demand the politicians and congress resolve this fiscal cliff, but resolve it in a way that makes our country stronger. that's why the president's come here to metro detroit. we're the home for u.s. manufacturing. also we're the home for the american worker. we need to resolve our fiscal problems, but resolve them in a way that continues to investigation in training and educating our workers and advanced manufacturing and also providing the revenue that we need to still provide health care to our seniors and social security to those who depend on it. >> sir, let's talk about getting to the sensible center here. because as the politico poll that i referenced earlier off the top of the show indicates, 59% oppose significant cuts to defense but 75% favor across the board spending cuts. so where are you and other colleagues willing to start with those spending cuts? i mean, what are democrats willing to put on the table specifical
this in washington. as the legendary everett dirksen once said, a billion here a billion there, pretty soon you're talking real money, about you this debate isn't just about the billions here and there. for average families the payroll tax cut that started two years ago is worth around 1000 as year. those families tend to spend that cash because they need it now. republicans say this is one tax cut they hate and the last time it was going to expire, the white house launched a whole campaign about $40 a paycheck. they asked families to send in their stories about what $40 meant to them. well, you know something? $40 a still a lot of cash for the families hit hardest by the great recession. for the wealthy people sitting around the negotiating table in d.c., $40 is just another steak dinner for one. but for many people who voted them into office, it's the cost of groceries for a week of family dinners. let's not forget, they are the ones who still need an economic stimulus, not the families earning more than $250,000 a year. joining me today on a newsy day, "the huffington post" sam stein and the
't happen in washingtoners it would make great television. right-to-work laws in michigan became the 24th state in the nation. it allows union workers to opt out of paying union dues even if they're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if
on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the economy. but the big thing is hit there needs to be a balanced plan. we need more revenue and we need less spendin
now, washington bureau correspondent hampton pearson. let's see what the average american will or won't be seeing in their pi check. >> reporter: i'm here for the lump of coal portion of the program. if there's no deal, let's look at what happens to tax rates in just seven days and these stats are from the tax policy center. the annual income from somebody in the $50,000 to $75,000, about a $2,400 increase. jumping ahead to $100,000 to $200,000, the average tax increase, $6,600. tacking at that great divide of the wealthy, over $250,000, at least a $11,000 tax hike. over $1 million, more than $254,000. >> hampton, looking at that number, that's for those americans working right now. there are still struggling americans, millions looking for work and what's the fiscal cliff mean for them? >> reporter: okay. we have unemployment at 7.7% last month and mainly went down because people gave up looking for work and jdropped out of th job market and out of work six months or longer. 4.8 million americans, they're the folks worried the most about unemployment benefits not extended after the f
call members of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them two in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seeps to care more about keeping his speakership than about keeping the nation on firm financial footing. >> reporter: there have been all eyes on senator mitch mcconnell, the republican leader, the counterpart to harry reid because he has been pretty quiet early on in the negotiations. was defering speaker boehner to give the republican side. after hearing senator reid yesterday, senator mcconnell fired back. take a listen. >> we're coming up against a hard deadline here and i said, this is a conversation we should had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> reporter: now senator mcconnell also said he was disappointed because when he got a call from the president two nights ago right before the president left hawaii to come back here to the white house, senator mcconnell says that was the first time he heard from an
on the president to realize that this is a conversation that he has to have not just with washington but the rest of the country. bringing in business leaders, bringing in small business leaders, going out across the country. one reason i think why this time it's going to be different from the failures of the past, the debt ceiling debacle, the failure of the super committee, is i think the american people and particularly the american business community, realize what's at stake, and i think an awful lot of us, frankly, in both parties who are willing to get there -- i want to commend kelly as well. there's been a big group of us, well in excess of the majority in the senate who say we're willing to do our part. we want to give the speaker and the president room to get the framework, but we'll be there to fill in the details as we go forward. >> senator ayotte, there's not much time left here, and it does seem like an inordinate amount of time, almost a month has passed, and we have a description of stalemate and way far apart. >> candy, i see that as very disappointing, a big problem. that's why
. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington, and first it was ohio. then, indiana i understand and wisconsin. now the labor mooumt is fighting for its rights in lansing, michigan. out in the cold voicing outrage on the steps of the statehouse over right to work legislation that governor rick snyder says he will be signing when it reaches his desk likely tomorrow. joining me now nbc's ron mott live in lansing. ron, what is the latest, and how did this come to a head so quickly in michigan? >> reporter: it came together very quickly, andrea. good day to you. it's a cold day out here, but these folks are very fired up. they don't like the way that this legislation was pushed through the statehouse here. they believe that this was a republican strategy to go through a lame-duck session. they know they've got a little more democratic leaning legislature coming here next month, and they figure that this was the most opportune time to push this legislation through. a very small window of time to actually debate the issue, and then as you mention, tomorrow governor snyder is expected t
." live in the nation's capital. this is exciting. and you know, i said, let's do a show from washington, d.c., because they get so much stuff done there. it's like silicon valley. and going there when steve jobs was really bringing apple to the forefront -- >> a happening place. >> it is. it's where things happen. that's why we're here, steve rattner. >> washington is the place. with us on set, economic analyst steve rattner. also political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. andrea mitchell. and in new york, msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. and the co-anchor of "street signs," brian sullivan. we've got a lot to talk about, mike barnicle, but i saw a headline on the front page of "usa today," a tease that is very intriguing, and that is one of the greatest players in major league baseball trying to get his worth right now. and if i were a major league team, i would pass on josh hamilton in a new york second because the guy phoned it in when his team needed him the most. there's an attitude problem. and yet he could be such a huge payoff. are the red
and politico reporters on the role of lobbyists in those negotiations. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. both parties are reportedly still talking on the phone. as the deadline approaches, we are two weeks before christmas. eric cantor leaving open the possibility of of a post session. let's look of the numbers. the fiscal cliff deadline 22 days away. we want to begin with a look ahead at the second term agenda. in your mind, what did you think should be the number one priority. we will take your calls and comments. you can also join us on facebook and twitter. from the headlines this morning, including this from the washington post. there is also this story from "the huffington post." aspirations' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video
at 9:15, more about the role of social security. ♪ host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax
. >> that's true. >> yes. >> scarborough, commanding george washington. >> washingtonesque. >> tall. >> yes. >> dignity. >> same, 6'4", same thing, yeah. >> so clearly, it's mika brzezinski. >> really? >> when i left, they're still clapping. >> really? >> renaissance woman. >> is it the alcohol? >> i think it's more of the slaves, actually. >> the what? >> nothing. i didn't say anything. >> gotcha. >> you missed that. >> i did. >> the you're the jeffersonian. >> the art of power. the art of navigating power. >> with that, let's go to the most jeffersonian figure for the news. >> all right. we begin this morning with new urgency in the fiscal cliff negotiations with now just 21 days to reach a deal. that's three weeks. today president obama returns to campaign mode, taking his fiscal cliff message to detroit. yesterday the president and speaker boehner met privately at the white house. their first face-to-face meeting since they agreed last week to clear everyone else out of the negotiating room. neither side revealed anything about the meeting that was part of the agreement. only saying tha
washington, i'm don lemon. carol is off today. we begin this hour with spiraling concerns over syria and a desperate regime trying to hold on to power. this morning, washington announces it's deploying two patriot missile batteries and 400 troops to our nato ally turkey. it will bolster defenses to syria against its scud missiles and possible chemical weapons. >> it's a challenging time. it's a challenging time. it's a critical time. we just announced, just announced this morning that we are deploying two patriot batteries here to turkey, along with the troops that are necessary to man those batteries so that we can help turkey have the kind of missile defense it may very well need in dealing with threats that come out of syria. >> to cnn's nick paton walsh in beirut following the latest developments. nick is on the phone, what can you tell us? >> we don't know the exact location where the american troops are going to be stationed but the german parliament ratified part of its contribution, there will be three nato nations giving troops toward this. the u.s. two batteries and 400 tro
host: the two-hour washington journal this morning. the house and is in at 9:00. open telephones for any public policy issue you would like to discuss. you can see the numbers on your screen. you can also contact us on twitter, facebook, or by e-mail. you can see the addresses on your screen. let's start with an update on the so called "fiscal cliff." this is the washington post -- in a side arbucarticle -- that the washington post report on the fiscal cliff this morning. here's an article from "washington times" -- now this is from "politico." a situation that was in the paper couple weeks ago. looks li finally, before we go to phone calls, this article from the daily caller -- again, that is reported in the daily caller. we begin with a call from diane in julian, california, on our democratic line. caller: good morning, peter. my prediction came true, reelecting a president. women against violence acts, being held up by the house. john boehner and the republican house majority leader eric cantor. i tweeted last night quiet late saying the republicans are going to gang up on joh
u.s. energy information society and the center for strategic and international studies. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. it is friday, december 7, 2012. the 71st anniversary on the attack of pearl harbor. reaction continues this morning over yesterday's resignation announcement of jim demint. the approach and fiscal clift deadline continues to loom over congress and the white house. that is where we want to begin. is it ok for leaders to compromise, or should they stick to their principles and would it be ok if doing so sent us over the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media websites. a very good morning to you. i want to begin with the question of compromise or sticking to principle. this is a question a gallup organization asked in a recent poll. it found 62% of americans would like to see the federal government leaders compromise on an agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff budget measures set to go into effect next month. more than twice the 25% who want leaders to stick to their principles. a m
kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up, we begin with breaking news out of washington tonight with just 18 days until the country's economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff, turns out president obama and house speaker john boehner have just wrapped up a surprise meeting at the white house. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. again, good evening, eamon. >> good evening, larry. we're told the meeting at the white house was in the oval office. it was about 50 minutes long. boehner and obama were joined by a couple key players, including tim geithner and rob neighbors, the white house's liaison to capitol hill. he's the go-to guy who's been shuttling the paper back and forth throughout this. boehner was also joined by an aide that boehner sources have not named. i don't want to read too much into this larry. but you can get a sense from the amount of people in the room that they're getting into at least some level of detail here. if it was just the two principals, you'd expect a more general conversation. with that number of people in the room, maybe some more
. and a mad scramble is on here in washington to avoid the drastic tax hikes and spending cuts that many fear will plunge the economy back into recession. president obama flies back from hawaii tonight to be ready if the senate comes back with a plan when it returns to work tomorrow. and house leaders are huddling with members on stand-by to return. senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following all of it for us. what are you hearing? >> there was a conference call of course members of the house leadership even, they're back in their districts, but there was a conference call today among those house republican leaders trying to figure out if and when the house should come back into session. two republican sources tell me they did not make a decision on this call. it's still up in the air. and a big reason for that is if anything can get done in the next six days, the ball is in the senate's court. the capitol is a ghost town. neither chamber in session. an eerie calm since the fiscal cliff only congress has the power to avert is less than one week away. from their home, senate demo
place to be in washington. listen, this is some serious high stakes political poker here. what can you tell us about the meeting at the white house today? >> well, we've heard different takes where you hear everybody has a different perspective on what happened depending on which party they're in. the big takeaway is everybody left grieving on the next step, which is that the senate will confer, the two leaders will confer and try to hammer out an agreement that democrats and republicans can both get on board with this what they will spend their day with tomorrow. we are not going to see or hear a lot of public action tomorrow. then they'll try to sell it to their respective parties on sunday, as you said, they'll try to bring it to a vote maybe sunday night or sometime monday morning in the senate. and at least there's agreement on the next steps, john. it's better than nothing. >> thank you, jessica. it will be a working weekend. the minnesota majority in the house of representatives will of course be key to getting any deal across the finish line. "outfront" tonight, republican cong
, and chip reid is in washington. >> president obama will be arriving in washington tomorrow and both houses of congress will be back in session tomorrow. that will give them just five days to put together a deal to avoid the massive automatic tax hikes and spending cuts known as the fiscal cliff. >> president obama spent christmas day visiting with troops in hawaii. >> while back in washington uncertainty about the looming fiscal cliff continues. there has been to communication between republicans and democrats about how to avoid going over the cliff. before the christmas break, speaker john boehner was unable to get enough support from respects to pass his plan and help said it was up to the white house and the senate to avert the cliff. so now harry reid is believed to be crafting a plan of his own. it's expected to extend bush-era tax cuts. it would also include short-term spending cuts instead of the massive cuts that would occur if there is no deal. it would also patch up the alternative minimum tax that will hit even more middle class families and schedule a
, explain to all of us because it appears the lights are out in washington d.c. the president is in hawaii. everyone is home. with all the sides saying that they expect to go over the cliff, it looks pretty likely that that might just happen. >> well, i certainly think that concern is growing. that that's a real possibility at this point. at the same time, thomas, i think there's still so much pressure on all sides so get something done because as he heard joe lieberman said, the consequences would be huge. the economy could potentially slip back into recession. the white house has described this as a working vacation for president obama, but the reality is that negotiations are largely deadlocked on all sides. there have been a few talks going on at the staff level, but the real bulk of this work is going to get done when lawmakers return to washington later this week after the christmas holiday and resume manageses. that's when we're going to see the focus really shift away from the house and on to the senate. of course, speaker boehner tried to get his plan b, alternative bill through t
back to us. >> yeah. thank you. >>> there is some action in washington tonight. at this hour the senate has just passed a $60 billion aid bill for communities slammed by super storm sandy. that vote was 61 for, 33 against. sandy road ashore devastating several areas and the senate rejected a republican amendment to cut the immediate cost to just 23 million clearing the way for final action on the $60 billion bill. the bill now goes to the house where its passage is uncertain because of the non-sandy-related spending items that are in the bill. typical sausage making for washington. >>> let's get to our panel. here now is blake zeff, former obama campaign aide and washington editor. robert, have you heard anything in the last couple of hours that suggests to you that somehow by monday mitch mcconnell and harry reid will sing kumbaya, pass something in the senate that also passes the house? >> i'm not so sure they'll be sing kumbaya, but the real story today is that there's movement on capitol hill. reid and mcconnell come out of that white house meeting and they're ready to haggle over s
washington. what's the the latest on the talks or the silence? >> the silence seems to be golden, john. remember last week when all the players involved seem to be posturing and positioning and talking about negotiations? not so much, at least in the past few days. we know president obama and house speaker john boehner had a one-on-one meeting, right, on sunday, their first since mid-november. what were the details from that meeting and from the ongoing discussions? they're not really -- both sides are not really being forthcoming with what the substance of those conversations, both sides yesterday, the white house and the republican leadership put out statements. they're essentially the same. i'll read just one from boehner's press secretary. discussions with the white house are taking place but we have no detail to share about the substance of those conversations. the republican offer made last week remains the republican offer and we continue to wait for the president to identify the spending cuts he's willing to make as part of the balanced approach he promised the american people.
bash is live in washington, d.c. this morning. 50 minutes and sort of a very milquetoasty kind of statement at the end of it, sounds not good. >> no, not good, considering where we are in the calendacale. i'm told by sources in both parties, a meeting that did not produce any new ideas, more of touching base meeting, the president wanted to talk to the speaker before he went home to ohio, which he still planned to do this weekend, the sources say that the basic problem still is, soledad, after all of the weeks, is democrats still believe republicans have the problem. they need to deal with the debt crisis by raising more revenue, meaning raising more taxes and republicans still think democrats are the problem. they are not offering enough in spending cuts. the issue is, reality, democrats, the president has the most leverage. has had the most leverage, republicans know that. everybody see where is this will probably go. republicans have to give some on the rate increases for the most wealthy. and the question, when is it most politically advantageous for both sides to agree to
. >> and in washington, the nra breaks it's silence. the kudlow report starts now. >> all right let's go to john harwitt first in dc. i think i agree with what you were saying first. >>> he moved to plan b and the hope that further negotiations could produce progress. >> our plan b would protect american taxpayers who make $1 million or less and have their current rates extended. i continue to have hope. that would reduce spending as well as revenues on the table. >> but of course the democrats in the senate. didn't see plan b as a step forward. harry reid came out and said, john boehner is walking away from the nenegotiations. >> every time we get down to something from the long-term financial think for this country. they do the charlie brown thing, they jerk the ball away. and this is what is going on. >> the posturing conceals the process that we are not aware of. but i talked to a budget aid that said, he thinks things are getting worse in terms for prospects of a deal. >> by the way, my contacts have said the same thing. you thank you very, very much. all of this may be defying predictions. it is a
doocy is live in our washington newsroom with more on that. so what is the state department's explanation, peter? >> reporter: jon, last week on december 19th the state department spokeswoman, victoria knew land put out a statement said in plain english their accountability review board that looked to what happened in benghazi on september 11th had flagged the performance of four officials. this is a quote. the secretary has accepted eric bosswell's decision to resign assistant secretary for diplomatic security effective immediately. the other three individuals have been relieved of their current duties. all four individuals have been placed on administrative leave pending further action. but, the "new york post" is now reporting that eric bosswell has not resigned and all four of those stated department employees are still on the state department's payroll. >> just shifted the deck chairs and they want to make the american people believe that the state department has held people accountable for their lack of security and sending help to four brave americans. this is incredi
labor unions. >>> here in washington, republicans turn the tables on president obama. we're going to tell you what specific information they are now demanding. >>> and who was she? you're going to find out why a century's old mystery may be closer to a solution. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's dramatic defeat for union workers in the industrial's heartland. this was the scene as republicans pushed through right to work bills saying that they don't have to pay union dues in in order to get a job. on lookers chanted, shame on you after the vote. this is a watershed moment because michigan is the same as countless union struggles, including this 1932 march where five people died and dozens were injured when unemployed workers were attacked by police and ford motor company security guards. after decades of gains, fewer than 12% of u.s. workers now belong to unions. in michigan, it's fewer than 18%. cnn's poppy harlow is at the state capital in lansing. how did it go? >> reporter: are an historic day in michigan. a state at the heart of organized
deutsch. >> incorporated. >> exactly. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. she is a huge fan in jane heller. >> jane heller said she looked extraordinarily elegant last night. >> you were remarkable last night on television. >> when andrea mitchell is involved in anything, it upgrades the elegance. >> made me feel better. >> we had to counter you somehow. >> that's why we brought her on. so under fire, rice ends her bid to succeed hillary at state. and this is the lead. president obama knew before he picked up the phone on thursday afternoon what susan rice, his ambassador to the united nations, was calling about. she wanted to take herself out of the running for secretary of state and spare him a fight. and that's exactly, mika, what she did. >> so brian williams asked her about this, and here's a little bit more of her explanation of how this happened. oh, we're standing by because -- what? you guys don't have the sound bite? okay. >> i guess so. >> so let's roll it. >> i've done sunday shows many times in the
about it. the only thing being we're relying on our leaders in washington to try to craft some sort of solution. >> did you have quotes around the word leader then? i'm only watching your lips. if you were to type that, would there be quotes around leaders? >> yes. >> thank you. i rest my case. >> i'm willing to take those quotes off. >> if they show that they are truly leaders without quotes. >> i come to work every day, my tallahassee paycheck, still in my wallet. i was a reporter. i made $137 a week. and if i had seen that go down to 127, i would have been angry. that was my subsistence. there are people who play for dinner in this country and their subsistence are on the line and they're going to be furious. but they're not going to get furious until they see their paycheck. >> it's going to impact gdp in the first quarter, and the second quarter. americans are feeling like they're protected from the democrats? because they're in lower income households? but they won't be. their paychecks will be less because the payroll tax cut will be gone. the amt, also gone. that will affect
in washington is quote/unquote if both sides complained. that means there was equal pain. the question is if that still applies today. we'll see. there has to be some movement here. is the threshold going to get moved up? how will the rank and file respond to speaker bain they are morning? he's not presenting them any plan, but when the update is done. and what happens? where are senate republicans? some of them are in a sour place. when do they decide to launch their quote/unquote plan bs, which would extend tax rates up to 250,000 and punt everything else? we'll see. the next 24 hours are everything. they have to get a deal, a framework in place to avoid any sort of punt. >>> now to a bit of good news, we could use it everywhere and here at nbc news we would like to show this, our colleague, richard engle and his crew are safe this morning after escaping gunmen in syria. they were held for five days before they were freed following a gun fight between the kidnappers and rebel forces in syria. they appeared on the "today" show this morning just hours after they release. here is a bit
but mandy has been celebrating boxing day all day. we didn't get any presents from lawmakers in washington yet. we're still five days away from falling off the proverbial fiscal cliff and wall street, like everybody else, is waiting for some kind of a solution here, and as you can see by today's numbers the waiting game continues, although we thank brian sullivan and you, mandy, for bringing us back to positive territory in the last hour. >> i'm not sure we can take credit but we'll take it. >> the dow is up a fraction at the moment. 13,139 after a meandering much of the day. the nasdaq hardest hit today. technology has been very volatile recently. still down a fraction right now. 13 points, fraction percentage-wise and the s&p is down 3.33 at 1423. five days left until the fiscal cliff deadline, and though the market has been very resilient to this point, what happens if we go over the cliff and if lawmakers cannot get it together come january 1st? will it be a big meltdown for wall street? that's what everybody wants to know. >> certainly hope know. in today's "closing bell" exchange, fo
right now are planning to make new year's eve plans here in washington, d.c. we're not so sure we're getting out of town yet. >> they should be plans you can cancel if case you have to go right back to work. let me ask a question. jessica says pressure is a great motivator. talk about pressure last night on speaker boehner, couldn't get enough support from his own party for his plan. what does that mean for any kind of bipartisan plan they might be working out? >> it really does illustrate how difficult it is going to be for democrats to even achieve what the president laid out tonight, a scaled down version. the speaker himself said a couple of times today that he believes that the reason why he didn't get even the majority of the caucus to support him was because of a lot of difficulty voting to raise taxes, voting for anything that can be perceived as a tax increase. well, what the president is talking about even scaled down version is definitely raising taxes. and raising taxes on people making $250,000 or more, at least households, so that's going to be difficult to do. that'
, as tragic as it is, brings us a little closer together both in the nation and in washington, that would be a good thing. >> all right. top of the hour. good morning. 6:00 on the east coast, it's wednesday, december 19th. christmas is almost here. >> very respectful dialogue. the nra had a respectful statement. i think a lot of people showing respect on this. >> feel something may be be happening. >> feel some grown-ups, maybe. there are, of course, exceptions. >> there are a few. we have mike barnicle with us. you're not an exception. beautiful piece in "the daily news" today. we'll read that in must read. thank you very much. former treasury officials. mark ratner is with us as well. he has a must read. i'm serious. >> beautiful. >> also in washington, washington anchor for "bbc world news america" katty kay. >> no pieces, sorry. >> you'll write one next time. thank you. so we've got a lot to get to this morning. >> a lot to talk about today. >> those exceptions, what are you talking about? >> just in the conversation about everything you thought there were two exceptions. >> rick perr
. >>> the bands of marriage. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. are we living in a liberal hour? four states voted against or actually voted last month either for gay marriage equality or against efforts to deny it. the issue that just eight years ago was used to deny victory to a democratic presidential candidate, john kerry, is now this country's majority opinion. well, something here has stirred but what is it in what has shifted the grunt tw-thirds against smement marriage to more than 50% for it in compassion, common sense, idea fatigue? the inability of opponents to specify a single argument against it or is it the sheer number of declarations to family, friends, co-workers and public by so many people that they are gay? is this why owe so many americans have changed their mind on marriage equality? in any case tonight a major break through in the conservative ranks. our guest clark cooper, president of the log cabin republicans, and joan walsh of salon.com. let's take a look at something that george will said this weekend and the
big late story in washington, speaker boehner goes to the white house. how close are they now to a deal? rudolph giuliani is here to say a lot about these things. i'll ask him if america is getting more dangerous in the wake some of very shocking high-profile gun crime. >>> he was known as one of the west memphis three now damien echols is adjusting to life as a free man. >> i was in a state of extreme shock and trauma. >> and how he survived 18 years on death row. >> it's absolutely nightmarish. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening, you're looking live at the white house where president obama has had one of those win some, lose some kind of days. the president and john boehner met for 50 minutes in a meeting being called frank. when basically translates to no deal yet. but the good news was, quote, the lines of communication remain open. the bad news, ambassador susan rice was withdrawing from the short list to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. >> i withdrew my name because i think it's the right thing for the country and i think it's the right thi
report" start ises right now. >>> the big news tonight, still the developments in washington on the fiscal cliff, eamon javers joins us with the details. >> good evening, meshel. capitol hill sources tell cnbc that congressional leaders are planning to go to the white house tomorrow to meet with president barack obama and it is not entirely clear at this point when that meeting will take place and details are still being hammered out and we saw today a blistering series of rhetorical jabs from one side to the other and it's not clear as a result of all that whether a deal can, in fact, get hammered out in the remaining time before new year's eve and take a listen to senate republican leader mitch mcconnell earlier today explaining the problems he's facing in washington. take a listen. >> the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> we do know t
ball and washington post correspondent. dana, the president said he'd veto it. what's boehner's strategy here? wh where is he going with this? >> he has to negotiate within his own caucus and it is not at all clear that he had the votes here until he started to sweeten it as you were talking about earlier there. he basically needs to appease the hard right in his caucus and he -- this is why it is so unlikely and i think it's always been unlikely that you get anything resembling a deal until the last minute or past the last minute because these guys will not give in unless they absolutely have to. >> republicans seem like they're in a little bit of disarray right now. the conservative club for growth came out against plan b and this is on "the wall street journal" editorial page. by tuesday afternoon even mr. boehner seemed to be throwing up his hands. either way we get a tax increase without a tangible progression on the spending problem. >> is it why the republicans have this? >> this is a significant test of boehner's ability behind a tax increase which is a difficult thing
to this story. you will keep a straight face because it's important. >>> the "washington post" is reporting the u.s. army is getting rid of soldiers, dismissing them because they don't meet fitness standards. obesity is a rising concern in the armed forces, has even been cited by military officials as a national security concern. between 1998 and 2010, the number of active duty military personnel characterized as overweight or obese has more than tripled and now the leading cause of ineligibility for people who want to join the army, according to military officials. want to know what the healthiest states are? >> i want to know how to live longer. the u.s. today says sitting on the set of a show is not the way. >> sitting too much or in snow too much. unless you live in vermont, massachusetts, connecticut or utah. >> unhealthiest, alabama. >> will die. >> south korea, west virginia, arkansas, louisiana, mississippi. >> what all those states have in common. north carolina. i see no trend. h i was in the land of -- let's do the news. >> i just was, actually. >> two sides of the story. >> okay
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